Silkies For Sale – 7/7/19

Here is what is available for the week of July 7, 2019.  My next scheduled hatches are for July, 12, July 21 and July 26th.  We are NPIP and a state inspected hatchery.  No Shipping/Pick up only.  Chicks are unsexed.

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Pen 21 – Newborns hatched 7/6 – 4 White, 5 black, 4 buff, 2 grey, 1 partridge – $11 each.

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Pen 20 – One week olds hatched 7/1 – 3 black, 3 white – $12 each.

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Pen 6 – One week olds hatched 6/26 – 2 black, 1 white – $12 each.

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Pen 7 – Two week olds hatched 6/21 – 3 white – $13 each.

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Pen 8 – Three week olds hatched 6/16 – 2 white – $14 each.

If you have questions or would like to set up a time to come out and pick up some silkie chicks you can text me at 612-756-1414 or PM me at  VJP Poultry on Facebook.

Silkies For Sale – 7/2/19

Here is what is available for the week of July 2, 2019. My next scheduled hatches are for July 1, July 6, July 12 and July 21st.  We are NPIP and a state inspected hatchery. No shipping /Pick up only.

Pen 21 – Newborns hatched 6/26 – 4 white, 6 black – $11 each.

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Pen 20 – Newborns hatched 6/26 – 1 splash, 1 buff, 3 grey partridge – $11 each.

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Pen 6 – One week olds hatched 6/21 – 4 white, 1 black, 1 buff, 1 gray – $12 each.

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Pen 7 – Two week olds hatched 6/16 – 2 white, 1 black – $13 each.

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If you have questions or want to set up a time to come out and pick up some chicks you can text me at 612-756-1414 or PM me at the VJP Poultry Facebook page.

Silkies For Sale – 6/26/19

Here is what is available for the week of June 26, 2109.  My next scheduled hatches are for 6/26, 7/1, 7/6 and 7/12.  We are NPIP and a state inspected hatchery.  No shipping/Pick up only.  Chicks are sold unsexed but ask us about our rooster return policy.

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Pen 21 – Newborns hatched 6/21 – 5 buff, 1 splash, 4 gray/partridge, 1 partridge – $11 each.

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Pen 20 – Newborns hatched 6/21 – 7 white, 5 black – $11 each.

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Pen 6 – One week olds hatched 6/16 – 3 white, 1 black, 1 grey/partridge – $12 each.

If you want to set up a time to come out and look at silkies or if you have questions, you can contact me through text at 756-1414 or PM me at the VJP Poultry Facebook page.

Chicken Themed Gift Wrap

When it comes to wrapping paper, we want something that reflects our own personal obsessions or those to whom the gift is for.  People who like chickens often like to find special or unique gift wrap featuring pictures of chickens.  Maybe someone you know is crazy about poultry and you would like to find a wrapping paper to show that you are thinking about what makes them excited.

Starting with a humorous one, we have Hands Off My Chicken Nuggets.

71608VEk-GL._SL1001_Roosters on a brilliant white background will be eye catching wrapped with raffia ribbon.

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Chickens in Profile is a beautiful teal green and grey premium gift wrap.  Vibrant, eye-catching and certain to build anticipation for the intended recipient.

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Rooster Cock a doodle do Kraft paper and matching gift boxes are a perfect wrap for the chicken enthusiast in your life.

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Keeping it Rural with this Rise and Shine Rooster Back 40 paper. Us some glitter chicken wire ribbon with it.7149fgS1u2L._SL1001_

Dress up a one-of-a-kind gift with this Keep Calm and Love Chickens paper.71H78MXd+nL._SY355_

Tassotti  and Cavallini have two beautiful sets of wrapping paper. Almost too nice to use, you may want to frame it. The first is Chickens and Roosters 51CqyJWqLZL

and the second is Common Breeds of  Chickens71CYe+eMjvL._SL1200_

Beautiful Italian wrapping paper featuring Baby Chicks. 61Bg0vJ9G8L._SL1000_

Alex Clark has a few designs printed in England. Checkerboard Chickens 512LzaXE3nL._SX355_

and Three French Hens61cPkfROwhL._SY550_

As long as we are thinking of Christmas, we have Peck The Halls, which is a whopping 100 square feet of paper.91hQulit-hL._SY606_

Everyone will be Oohing and Ahhing over your choice of Chicken and Peeps Kraft wrapping paper. This also has the optional matching gift boxes.71a5YSo5EmL._SL1000_

Sophie Allport has understated chicken gift wrap imported from England. It is a thick matte paper and very proper for your humble gift.91CFWVHpHYL._SX355_

Caskata studio has a stunning Egg print paper that is truly beautiful.81Xy65sWrkL._SL1200_

To store all of this gorgeous paper you may need one of these gift wrap storage containers.61z7dssQVeL._SL1000_

Who knew that there were so many chicken themed wrapping papers available. One last one is the I suspect Fowl Play gift wrap.

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This would look great paired with a rusty chicken wire ribbon615zyGmn9bL._SL1250_

For more tips and tricks for raising outstanding silkies check out our Chicken Learning Center at VJPPoultry.com .  VJP Poultry is an NPIP and state inspected hatchery located 30 miles north of St. Paul.  We hatch out silkies all year long so we always have stock available.  Like us on Facebook to get weekly updates on what we currently have for sale.

Victoria J. Peterson

buy_now_amazon    Click Here

 

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How to Practice Biosecurity in Your Own Backyard Silkie Flock

7a31a8c5e329aa4f6b0d5ac6083b2c62Everyone wants their chickens to be healthy, but are you truly giving them the best protection possible?  There are some very lethal poultry diseases out there and you may, without even knowing it, be bringing those pathogens into your backyard. It is important to think about setting up some kind of defense between disease and your birds.

When we use the term “Biosecurity” we are talking about a system of methods that, used correctly, will help to protect your birds from the unseen viruses and bacteria that are looking for a new home. We don’t want that new home to be your chicken coop.

There are many contagious diseases out there that can effect your flock.  There has been an outbreak of Virulent Newcastle Disease is southern California this summer.  This particular outbreak is effecting small backyard flocks and not the large commercial poultry houses like we saw with the Avian Flu a few years back. The Newcastle outbreak highlights the need for year round poultry biosecurity.  If biosecurity is not practiced it would be very easy for Newcastle disease to make its way across the United States infecting birds as it hitches a ride on the tires of a truck or on the bottom of someone’s shoe.

The first thing that you can do is to keep things clean in your own backyard.  Something as simple as washing your hands or using hand sanitizer  before entering or exiting your bird area can be effective. Change food and water daily in your pen.  Clean and disinfect cages, tools or other equipment that comes in contact with your birds or their droppings. There are several good disinfecting products.  I use Oxivir on everything. Other good products include Oxine and Virkon S.  Cleaning and disinfecting are important steps to keep your bird’s environment healthy.  Disinfectants only work effectively when you first clean all dirt,  manure, and bird droppings from your tools, cages, boots and equipment. Clean these things outside of your house to keep germs outside.

Have a separate set of clothes and shoes that you wear only in your poultry area. I have a pair of slogger boots that I only wear when I am doing chicken chores. They slip on and off easily and can be cleaned daily with a garden hose.  I do not go down to the chicken coop unless I am wearing those boots. I have a set of snowmobile boots that I use in the winter for chicken chores. When I go into the house I change into my house shoes.  Those shoes I will wear in the brooder room and the incubation area.  I wear an apron in the brooder room that is washable.  Outside in the adult chicken area I have a coat that I only wear when doing chicken chores. It is washable as well. I also wear gloves that are easily washed as well.   It is important to me to keep the adult chicken germs away from the baby chick area and the rest of the house.  Wash and disinfect shoes and clothes often.

It is important to keep other people and other birds away from your flock as much as possible. That includes birds you just bought and wild birds. Both could carry disease to your chickens.  Restrict access to your property and your birds.  Avoid visiting farms or other households with poultry.  At your own place, do not let visitors near your birds at all if they have their own birds. It is sad to have to say this, but you need to protect your flock.  If you can’t avoid contact with others then make sure that you disinfect your shoes and clothes before being with your birds again.  This is why you need separate boots and coats that you only use with your chickens.  Don’t use other people poultry equipment without disinfecting it first.

If you like to exhibit birds at poultry shows, make sure that you quarantine birds for at least two weeks after the event. Wear different shoes and clothing when at the show or fair and disinfect when you return home. Disinfect cages that were used for transport.

Be sure to buy birds from a reputable source. Check and see what kind of biosecurity they practice.   Someone who is an NPIP breeder has their flock pullorum tested every year and can only buy from others who are NPIP.  A state inspected hatchery has a state vet come out and inspect the premises every year and discusses biosecurity standards with them.  Whoever you do buy from make sure that you keep new birds quarantined for at least 30 days.

Don’t let wild birds have contact with your flock.  If your birds are outside, consider keeping them in a screened area. Do not let wild birds eat food in your chicken run. This will also help keep insects and rodents away.  Hang fly strips or fly traps in the coop. Flies can transmit disease on the bottom of their feet. Put out mouse traps and clean up spilled feed to keep your area rodent free.

Change is always hard especially if you are used to doing things in a certain way. Just pick one suggestion and start with that. Once it becomes a habit, choose another biosecurity measure to implement.  You will feel better knowing that you are keeping your flock safe and healthy.

 

 

For tips and tricks for raising outstanding silkies check out our Chicken Learning Center at VJPPoultry.com .  VJP Poultry is an NPIP and state inspected hatchery located 30 miles north of St. Paul.  We hatch out silkies all year long so we always have stock available.  Like us on Facebook to get weekly updates on what we currently have for sale.

Victoria J. Peterson

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