Silkies For Sale 6/17/2020

In response to the Covid-19 crisis we are modifying the way we conduct business.  All silkie sales will be done curbside.  Preferred payment is cash but we also use Venmo. Contact me through Private Message on Facebook to inquire about availability.  We will schedule an appointment and I will have the chicks boxed up and waiting for you.  This is to insure the safety of everyone involved..

We hatch out silkie chicks every week at VJP Poultry.  We are NPIP, Pullorum tested and a Minnesota state  inspected hatchery.  No Shipping/Pick up only.  We sell one  week old unsexed silkie chicks.  We also sell 4 month old female silkie pullets.  We can no longer accept rooster returns.  If you are not allowed to have roosters where you live I would recommend that you consider a four month old female silkie pullet.

20200311_132824

We currently have a waiting list for 4 month old female silkie pullets.  They are $70 each.  Contact me if you would like to be added to the list.

20190130_155424-1 One week old silkie chicks are $14 each. Silkie chicks are not sexed.

 

If you have any questions or would like to set up a time to come out and pick up some silkies, you can contact me by texting 612-756-1414 or PM me at the VJP Poultry Facebook page.

 

Silkies For Sale – 2/3/17

Improve your Silkie Hatch Before the Incubator – 3/2/17

20161019_115944Many people enjoy incubating and hatching eggs in the springtime. Whether you use an incubator or a broody hen to do your work, the hatchability  of the egg itself is of the up most importance.

The first step is to start with healthy, happy hens. Healthy hens are hens that eat a varied diet that is high in protein such as Gamebird Conditioner. Varied can mean table scraps or what they find free ranging. Healthy means being free from disease and parasites.

Hens must also be getting a source of calcium in their diets. This can be obtained through their feed (layer feed) or added in the form of oyster shell. This will help to strengthen the shell of the egg.

Happy hens are hens that are not too crowded. They have clean bedding and clean containers for food and containers for water. They have companion hens so they are not ostracized or alone. They have access to the outside and plenty of room to scratch and take dust baths.

The ability of the rooster to perform his duty will make a huge difference in whether or not your egg will be fertile. If the hen was not mated successfully , the egg will not become fertilized.  You may need to trim around the vents on both the rooster and then hen so that contact can be made easier. The feathers can get in the way. Use a curved scissor with a blunt end to safely cut the feathers.

Age of both the hens and roosters can also play a part in the hatching ability of the egg. Young hens who are just beginning to lay often lay very small eggs. These are nick named “pullet eggs” and they have a low chance of hatching out chicks.  Young roosters also are very inexperienced  when mating and the eggs are often not fertile.  Older hens and roos also experience the problems of infertility. Older hens often lay sporadically and eventually stop laying altogether.  Older roosters can become heavy and have a harder time mounting the hens.

The area where the hens lay their eggs should be clean and soft. I add fresh bedding to those spots every day.  Broody hens come in handy as they will sit on other hens eggs and protect them from getting dirty or getting stepped on and broken.  Some birds will try to peck and eat eggs left alone in the nest.

Eggs need to stay dry and clean and collected several times a day.  Do not wash dirty eggs but gently pick off the dirt or use fine sand paper to rub it off.  Washing will destroy the “bloom” on the eggs and allow bacteria to enter it.

Store your collected eggs in a dry, cool spot. I have a place in the cellar that stays around 50 degrees all year round.  Do not keep eggs longer than 10 days before incubating as their fertility will drop. Eggs that are odd shapes do not hatch well. Eggs that have very porous shells do not hatch well either.

Eggs that are shipped can often become “scrambled” and do not have a good development and hatching rate.  It is best to buy eggs close by and not have them go through the postal service.

Following these simple suggestions will increase the chances of your eggs hatching even before you place them in the incubator. Each egg is precious at VJP Poultry and we do our best to make sure that each egg can improve its chance at hatchability!

For tips and tricks for raising outstanding silkies check out our Chicken Learning Center at VJPPoultry.com .  VJP Poultry is an NPIP and state inspected hatchery located 30 miles north of St. Paul.  We hatch out silkies all year long so we always have stock available.  Like us on Facebook to get weekly updates on what we currently have for sale.

Victoria J. Peterson

20161015_165444

 

 

 

 

Silkies For Sale – 2/20/17

Remodeling at VJP Poultry – 2/13/17

20170128_105904     If you have visited VJP Poultry in the past you more than likely have visited the “chick room.”  It is a little room off of our garage that houses all of the silkie chicks that are currently for sale. It’s a fun little room with all of its cheeping and classical music, but it also had some problems.

The room had never been properly finished. The sheet rock was water stained and drab. The chick pens were not arranged so that they could be easily cleaned, and it was simply too tight of a space to move around in.  Any more than having two people in that room was too crowded.  It was time for a change.

The January thaw was just the right time to move all of the chicks out and onto the floor of the garage.  My car would need to sit outside until the project was over.  We put out a few space heater so all of the chicks were kept toasty warm.

The first step was to clean and clear out everything. There were tables, shelving and a bunny hutch to move out. I try to keep the room clean but there was a ton of dust everywhere that all had to be blown out.

When the room was empty we began to tape the drywall. There were also lots of holes in the sheet rock to plaster over and make smooth. The floor needed to be scraped. A lot had stuck to it over the years.

Next we needed to prime the walls with white. When it was dry we could finally paint. I chose a lavender hue (luscious lavender was the name of it.) This color matches the purple house theme and blends in nicely with our logo purple colors.

Some insulation was added near the door and then molding was added along the floor. The white metal cabinets were quite rusty so those needed to be sanded, primed and painted. A new light fixture was added to make it easier to see the birds clearly.

Lastly we purchased new shelving. This will be the key to making the pens easier to get at and to making it more spacious.

I love the changes that were made. Thanks to my husband who is always there with the vision. VJP Poultry is better than ever!

For tips and tricks for raising outstanding silkies check out our Chicken Learning Center at VJPPoultry.com .  VJP Poultry is an NPIP and state inspected hatchery located 30 miles north of St. Paul.  We hatch out silkies all year long so we always have stock available.  Like us on Facebook to get weekly updates on what we currently have for sale.

Victoria J. Peterson

20170124_062218